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Health

Health

Over the past three decades, life expectancy and general population health has improved significantly in developing countries. Still, a number of major challenges remain. Each year, more than 250,000 women and 3.1 million infants die during childbirth, another 4 million children die before they reach the age of five from preventable conditions like pneumonia, malaria, and diarrheal diseases. Malnutrition causes 165 million children to be stunted, 101 million to be underweight, and 52 million to suffer from wasting. Despite the development and proliferation of anti-retroviral drugs, HIV/AIDS continues to be a major driver of mortality. The fight against TB is getting more complicated due to the growth in drug resistance. Eradicating Malaria still seems a distant possibility. These grim statistics are concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

To make matters worse, non-communicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, once considered exclusive to wealthier countries, are now exacting a very heavy toll on low and middle income countries. Basic healthcare infrastructure, particularly in rural areas, is seriously underdeveloped, because the attention of the global health community has been on vertical solutions to the major infectious diseases.

A new generation of technologies—affordable medical devices, new vaccines and pharmaceuticals for the most deadly diseases, and ICT-enabled platforms for last mile delivery of care to rural areas—will need to be developed, if we are to overcome these problems.

Health

Over the past three decades, life expectancy and general population health has improved significantly in developing countries. Still, a number of major challenges remain. Each year, more than 250,000 women and 3.1 million infants die during childbirth, another 4 million children die before they reach the age of five from preventable conditions like pneumonia, malaria, and diarrheal diseases. Malnutrition causes 165 million children to be stunted, 101 million to be underweight, and 52 million to suffer from wasting. Despite the development and proliferation of anti-retroviral drugs, HIV/AIDS continues to be a major driver of mortality. The fight against TB is getting more complicated due to the growth in drug resistance. Eradicating Malaria still seems a distant possibility. These grim statistics are concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

To make matters worse, non-communicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, once considered exclusive to wealthier countries, are now exacting a very heavy toll on low and middle income countries. Basic healthcare infrastructure, particularly in rural areas, is seriously underdeveloped, because the attention of the global health community has been on vertical solutions to the major infectious diseases.

A new generation of technologies—affordable medical devices, new vaccines and pharmaceuticals for the most deadly diseases, and ICT-enabled platforms for last mile delivery of care to rural areas—will need to be developed, if we are to overcome these problems.

universalclinic-health-itt500

The Universal Clinic: A powerful solution for last mile healthcare delivery

Quality, affordable healthcare in rural areas, particularly for mothers and children, remains an elusive goal for most developing countries. The problem is multi-faceted and systemic. There are far too few functioning clinics, existing medical devices are too expensive and complex to use, there aren't enough qualified clinicians, there is far too little funding in most developing country health systems to build the system from the bottom-up, and external aid has proven neither sufficient nor sustainable. To overcome these interconnected problems, we are developing the Universal Clinic. More
vaccine-health

Solar-powered vaccine refrigeration: Ensuring every child is immunized

Vaccine delivery is still an unsolved problem, due to the absence of reliable refrigeration. Each year, 1.5 million children under the age of five die from vaccine-preventable diseases, because they do not receive immunization. In addition, 26 million children in that age group—roughly one in five born each year—remain unimmunized, and at significant risk of disease. All this happens even as half of the vaccines in developing countries, where they are made available virtually free of cost, have to be discarded due to spoilage. More
TT-BLog

Vermifiltration composting toilets: The way to clean, green sanitation

Diarrheal disease is the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide, responsible for 710,000 childhood deaths each year. It is also a major contributor to malnutrition, which in turn is believed to underlie 45% of all childhood deaths around the world. The principal driver of diarrheal disease is the absence of accessible toilets through much of the developing world. Human fecal matter contains a number of pathogens that are harmful when consumed by humans, particularly children. In the absence of toilets, many people defecate in to open, and this releases the fecal pathogens into the environment. More

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